Basket Cabbage tree Crowning glory Emergence English Summer Flax metamorphosis Flax top Freesias Fuchsia procumbens Kaka beak Kaka metamorphosis Kauri Koru Kowhai Kowhai botanical Lancewood Nikau palm Panorama Pohutukawa Pohutukawa leaves 5 Pohutukawa leaves 7 Poroporo Secrets Separation Underground Zucchini

Phormium tenax - Basket

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 425x570mm - NZ$140, with a mat and backing board $250, framed $570
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Cabbage tree, ti kouka

Cordyline australis

With its tall, straight trunk and dense, rounded heads, C. australis is a characteristic feature of the New Zealand landscape. It grows up to 20 metres high with a stout trunk and sword-like leaves. Its fruit is a favourite food source for the New Zealand pigeon and other native birds. This endemic tree is a member of the orchid family and features highly fragrant flowers. It is one of the few New Zealand forest trees that can recover from fire and can live for hundreds of years.

The genus name Cordyline derives from an Ancient Greek word for a club (kordyle), a reference to the enlarged underground stems or rhizomes, while the species name australis is Latin for "southern". The common name cabbage tree is attributed by some sources to early settlers having used the young leaves as a substitute for cabbage.

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Limited edition prints 350x520mm - NZ$140. Other print formats and sizes, with or without mat and framing, prices available on request

A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Crowning Glory

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - held by the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Pittsburgh, USA
Limited edition prints 465x613mm - NZ$84, with mat and backing board $150, framed $390
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Emergence

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - NZ$2,550 in neutral frame under UV glass with heavy mat
Limited edition prints 292x820mm - smaller sizes and pricing on application
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

English Summer

Inspired by a visit to England the flowers featured are Amaryllis belladonna, pansy, petunia, echinacea, geranium and Japanese windflower.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 165x220mm - NZ$32, with mat and backing board $86, framed $240
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Metamorphosis (10)

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 180x565mm - NZ$75, with mat and backing board $155, framed $400
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax

New Zealand Flax or Harakeke

This drawing was created as one of a four drawing submission to the Royal Horticultural Society which led to the invitation to exhibit.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 150x150mm - NZ$27, with mat and backing board $75, framed $205
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Freesias

Freesia hybrida

Freesias are native to South Africa and are named for Friedrich Heinrich Theodor Freese, a German student who studied African plants in the 19th century. They are a perennial bulb belonging to the Iridaceae, or Iris, family. Most freesias are available year-round, depending on their variety. Their colours include white, purple, yellow, red and orange and their average vase life is 4-7 days. This drawing was commissioned for a wedding anniversary.

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Limited edition prints 195x270mm - NZ$50, with mat and backing board $110, framed $270
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

NZ native fuchsia

Fuchsia procumbens

A tiny creeping fuchsia, has small rounded or heart shaped leaves and a spreading habit. Its green and yellow upward-facing flowers are followed by bright-red berries.

Now rare in the wild, the small (less than 20mm) upright flowers start out in a greenish-yellow tube-like form that opens and folds back exposing a purple tips and scarlet stamens within topped with bright blue pollen. It flowers from December to March with berries forming until early winter.

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Limited edition prints (partial image) 280x380mm - NZ$78, with mat and backing board $145, framed $290
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Kaka beak, Kowhai ngutukaka

Clianthus puniceus

‘Splendid flower’ from the Greek; kelos, glory and anthos, flower. Clianthus puniceus is a woody legume shrub native to New Zealand's North Island.  It is one of two species of Clianthus,  both have striking clusters of red flowers which resemble the beak of the Kaka, a New Zealand parrot. The plant is also known as Parrot's Beak, Parrot's Bill and Lobster Claw. There is also a variety with white to creamy coloured flowers. It was widely cultivated by pre European Maori.

The species is critically endangered in the wild, known only on Moturemu Island in the Kaipara Harbour. It is widely grown as a garden plant. Kaka beak grow to around two metres high, with spreading branches producing leaf stalks up to 15cm long bearing several pairs of small leaflets. They usually flower from spring through to early summer, but can flower twice a year or even year round.

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Limited edition prints 215x215mm - NZ$50, with mat and backing board $110, framed $260
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Kaka beak metamorphosis

Clianthus puniceus, Kowhai ngutukaka

‘Splendid flower’ from the Greek; kelos, glory and anthos, flower. Clianthus puniceus is a woody legume shrub native to New Zealand's North Island.  It is one of two species of Clianthus,  both have striking clusters of red flowers which resemble the beak of the Kaka, a New Zealand parrot. The plant is also known as Parrot's Beak, Parrot's Bill and Lobster Claw. There is also a variety with white to creamy coloured flowers. It was widely cultivated by pre European Maori.

The species is critically endangered in the wild, known only on Moturemu Island in the Kaipara Harbour. It is widely grown as a garden plant. Kaka beak grow to around two metres high, with spreading branches producing leaf stalks up to 15cm long bearing several pairs of small leaflets. They usually flower from spring through to early summer, but can flower twice a year or even year round.

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Limited edition prints 180x565mm - NZ$75, with mat and backing board $160, framed $400
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Kauri

Agathis australis

Agathis australis, commonly known as the kauri, is a coniferous tree found north of 38°S in the northern districts of New Zealand's North Island. It is the largest (by volume) but not tallest species of tree in the country, standing up to 50m tall in the emergent layer above the forest's main canopy. The tree has smooth bark and small oval leaves.

Though kauri are among the most ancient trees in the world, they have developed a unique niche in the forest. With their novel soil interaction and regeneration pattern they are able to compete with the more recently evolved and faster growing angiosperms.

The name comes from agathis (Greek) a ball of thread (referring to the appearance of the cone) and australis from Latin meaning southern.

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Limited edition prints 165x170mm - NZ$32, with mat and backing board $80, framed $220
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Black tree fern, Mamaku

Cyathea medullaris

Called mamaku, katata, korau, or pitauin in Maori, the evergreen black tree fern is a species of tree fern endemic to New Zealand. This fern is found to grow to heights of 20 m, making it the largest tree fern in New Zealand.

To Maori, the unfurling fern frond or koru symbolises new life, growth, strength and peace.

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Limited edition prints 150x150mm - NZ$27, with mat and backing board $75, framed $205
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Kowhai

Sophora microphylla

Most species grow to around 8 m high and have fairly smooth bark with small leaves. Sophora microphylla has smaller leaves (5-7 mm long by 3-4 mm wide) and flowers (2.5-3.5 cm long) than S. tetraptera which has leaves of 1-2 cm long and flowers that are 3cm-5cm long. They have horn-shaped yellow flowers, which appear in early spring. Their nectar is a favourite food for Tuis and Bellbirds.

The very distinctive, almost segmented pods, which appear after flowering each contain six or more smooth, hard, yellow seeds. Unusually for New Zealand plants, some species of Kowhai are deciduous, losing their tiny, dull green leaves each winter. Many other Kowhai trees lose most of their leaves immediately after flowering in October or November but quickly produce new leaves.

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Limited edition prints 150x150mm - NZ$27, with mat and backing board $75, framed $205
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Kowhai

Sophora tetraptera

Most species grow to around 8 m high and have fairly smooth bark with small leaves. Sophora tetraptera has leaves of 1-2 cm long and flowers that are 3cm-5cm long. They have horn-shaped yellow flowers, which appear in early spring. Their nectar is a favourite food for Tuis and Bellbirds.

The very distinctive, almost segmented pods, which appear after flowering each contain six or more smooth, hard, yellow seeds. Unusually for New Zealand plants, some species of Kowhai are deciduous, losing their tiny, dull green leaves each winter. Many other Kowhai trees lose most of their leaves immediately after flowering in October or November but quickly produce new leaves.

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Limited edition prints 200x295mm - NZ$42, with mat and backing board $114, framed $330
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Lancewood, horoeka

Pseudopanax crassifolius

The juvenile form, which lasts for between 15 and 20 years, is very easily recognized. The leaves are stiff and leathery with a prominent central rib, about 1cm wide and up to 1m long with irregular teeth, all growing downwards from a central stem, as pictured over. The young trunk has characteristic vertical swollen ridges. As the tree gets older the stem begins to branch producing a bushy top, and the leaves become wider and shorter, losing their teeth. It is only when the tree is mature that it adopts its "normal" shape - round-topped, with a straight clean trunk up to 50cm thick. Maximum height is 15 m.

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Limited edition prints 175x350mm - NZ$56, with mat and backing board $120, framed $325
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Nikau palm

Rhopalostylis sapida

This work was part of a commission of four NZ native species. Nikau is the southernmost palm of all species and is found in New Zealand; it is abundant in lowland forests of the North Island, and appears as far south as Banks Peninsula and Hokitika in the South Island, and in the Chatham Islands. The nikau palm grows to heights of 10 metres. Maori used the nikau leaves in their whares. The top of the stem is fleshy and juicy and is sometimes eaten.

The name derives from the Greek rhopalon or 'tapering club', stylos or 'pillar' and Latin sapidus 'savory' or 'tasty'.

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Limited edition prints 145x300mm - NZ$38, with mat and backing board $90, framed $260
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Panorama

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - Sold in London exhibition
Limited edition prints (reduced size) 410x593mm $140, with a mat and backing board $250, framed $570
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Pohutukawa

Metrosideros excelsa

This work was part of a commission of four NZ native species. The Pohutukawa is a coastal evergreen tree that produces a brilliant display of red flowers made up of a mass of stamens. The tree grows to a height of up to twenty metres, with a dome-like spreading form. Its natural range is in the northern coastal regions of the North Island of New Zealand, from Taranaki on the west coast, and as far south as Gisborne on the east coast.

The name derives from the Greek metra or "heartwood" and sideron or "iron". Excelsa is from the Latin excelsum, meaning high, elevated.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 140x185mm - NZ$30, with mat and backing board $80, framed $225
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Pohutukawa 5 leaves

Metrosideros excelsa

This work was a commission for a friend's 'significant' birthday - he wanted to be reminded of long, lazy summer holidays. The Pohutukawa is a coastal evergreen tree that produces a brilliant display of red flowers made up of a mass of stamens. The tree grows to a height of up to twenty metres, with a dome-like spreading form. Its natural range is in the northern coastal regions of the North Island of New Zealand, from Taranaki on the west coast, and as far south as Gisborne on the east coast.

The name derives from the Greek metra or "heartwood" and sideron or "iron". Excelsa is from the Latin excelsum, meaning high, elevated.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 140x325mm - NZ$38, with mat and backing board $90, framed $250
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Pohutukawa 7 leaves

Metrosideros excelsa

This work was Terrie's first completed drawing. The Pohutukawa is a coastal evergreen tree that produces a brilliant display of red flowers made up of a mass of stamens. The tree grows to a height of up to twenty metres, with a dome-like spreading form. Its natural range is in the northern coastal regions of the North Island of New Zealand, from Taranaki on the west coast, and as far south as Gisborne on the east coast.

The name derives from the Greek metra or "heartwood" and sideron or "iron". Excelsa is from the Latin excelsum, meaning high, elevated.

Original - retained by artist
Limited edition prints 130x290mm - NZ$35, with mat and backing board $90, framed $250
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Poroporo

Solanum laciniatum

A soft-wooded shrub 1-3 m tall, lasting several years, but becoming spreading and straggly with age. 

Solanum is the type genus of the family Solanaceae, which contains such well-known economic plants as the potato, tomato, tobacco, egg plant (aubergine) and many more. It’s Latin name is derived from solamen meaning to solace/ comfort and lacinia, meaning a lappet or flap of a garment, referring to the lobed leaves. It is a source of solasidine which is extracted and used as a base material for the production of steroid contraceptives. The plant is also used as a rootstock for grafting eggplant. Ripe fruit are eaten by Maori, especially children, but the unripe fruit are poisonous. The fruit were also very popular with the first European settlers, who used them for jam and fruit pies, calling them "bull-a-bull" or "Maori gooseberries".

Original - NZ$1,000 in a cream wood frame under uv glass with heavy mat
Limited edition prints 365x420mm - NZ$95, with mat and backing board $150, framed $325
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available shortly for $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Secrets

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work. The original was purchased by the RHS Lindley Library for their collection.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 150x290mm - NZ$38, with mat and backing board $100, framed $270
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Separation

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - NZ$1,500 framed under uv glass with heavy mat
Limited edition prints 425x570mm - NZ$140, with mat and board $250, framed $570
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Phormium tenax - Underground

New Zealand flax or harakeke

This drawing was one of eight created when Terrie was invited to exhibit at the Royal Horticultural Society's December 2008 show. She was awarded a gold medal for her work. The original was purchased by the RHS Lindley Library for their collection.

The scientific name Phormium, means 'basket' or 'wickerwork', and tenax means 'tenacity' or 'holding fast'. The rigid flower stalks can be up to five metres long, projecting high above the foliage. In November they produce clumps of curving tube-like flowers which turn bright orange red when mature. These produce unusually large quantities of nectar to attract all nectar feeding birds such as the tui as well as insects.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 205x275mm - NZ$42, with mat and backing board $118, framed $290
A6 greeting cards with envelopes - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)

Zucchini (Italian) or courgette (French)

Cucurbita pepo

This early drawing was created as a one off - it is a vegetable with a flower drawing! Greeting cards with this image have been very popular.

Zucchini is a plant, which is also known as baby marrow or squash. It belongs to the pumpkin family. Zucchini is the Italian name and Courgette is the French. The flowers can be eaten either fresh in salad, stuffed or used in soups and sautés.

Original - Sold
Limited edition prints 135x135mm - NZ$25, with mat and backing board $75, framed $210
A6 greeting cards - available $3 each or $20 for a 10 pack (same or assorted)